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Author Topic: Using Hydrogen Peroxide for Pest Control  (Read 2993 times)
farmer d
Farmer D

Posts: 3495


Hollywood, CA


« on: March 24, 2013, 08:40:29 AM »

A fellow hibiscus lover recently informed me that there are those that practice and believe that applying H2O2 to the plant tissue with a diluted mixture that can be stronger than the normal 3% we see at the drug store on your plants is a great natural way to effectively reduces pests populations as well faster seed germination rates and improved root development.

According to what I have read so far it sounds like the additional oxygen molecule is the important factor that works beneficially for plants.  In the case of pests it oxidizes the eggs and larvae effectively killing them but not the adults.  It also can be fed to plants for the increased root development and better crop yields.

One article in particular claims to use an 8% dilution rate that achieves these results without any burn to the plant.  I was wondering if anyone here on the forum is familiar with this or can provide some science behind whether this has some serious merit to it.

I'm always open to the idea of a natural way to control pests and with spring now here I have lots of aphids showing up currently along with those lovely thrips.

Farmer D
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Charlie
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Posts: 3507



« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2013, 04:30:09 AM »

Darren, I've not tried this so can't comment on whether it works well. There are what are called "stabilized hydrogen peroxide" products that are sold for horticulture and used to disinfect and treat against fungus, bacteria etc. I suspect the concentration of hydrogen peroxide necessary to kill larger organisms like white flies and mites is too high to be safe for many plants. However, destroying the eggs as you suggest would be a nice benefit and would eventually control any pest if it killed all of the eggs.

Some hydroponic growers circulate hydrogen peroxide in their water and some hydro stores carry big barrels of concentrated h2o2 for this purpose. Many people like it better than chlorine as a disinfectant because it breaks down into oxygen and water and is entirely safe at that stage. That is its weakness, too, since it breaks down rapidly in the presence of organic material.

Anyone with experience using hydrogen peroxide? We'd love to hear about it.

Charlie
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Cindy
Cindy Black, Webmaster, Customer Service
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Posts: 234



« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 09:32:37 AM »

Hydrogen peroxide is in our Houseplant Formula, but only at the 3% level, which is then further diluted with water. I've used it in houseplants as a low level fungicide in cold places for a long time at that level with good results. I've never tried the kind of high doses you're suggesting. I can try it on some test plants and see what happens. You're suggesting 8% diluted in water? Or 8% poured straight onto the soil, Darren? If undiluted, I think I'll try 3% first!
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Cindy
Southern California
farmer d
Farmer D

Posts: 3495


Hollywood, CA


« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2014, 12:57:06 PM »

Cindy I just saw your reply after over a year - shame on me.  

I still am interested in this idea and would like to try it out.  The article I read stated an 8% diluted concentration with water.  

The more I think about this idea the more I like it.  The only downside I see to it is how the H2O2 breaks down over time but at least it just oxygen and wayter.  Anyway to find something that is not a pesticide and the pests cannot develop a resistance to I am very interested in.

Same kind of win-win like horticultural oil that smothers pests - can't build up a resistance to smothering action!

Farmer D
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farmer d
Farmer D

Posts: 3495


Hollywood, CA


« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2014, 03:12:24 PM »

For anyone who is interested in obtaining more information about using hydrogen peroxide for gardening just Google "Bill Munroe peroxide gardening" to read articles commenting on his claims and techniques.  His website is Earthclinic.com

A big thanks to Ken Garlock for bringing this idea to my attention last year!

Farmer D
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Merkity

Posts: 38


« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2014, 09:08:52 PM »

have you tried it out?  just curious - I am overrun with pests this year -out of nowhere every pest on the list seems to be thriving in my plants. 
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farmer d
Farmer D

Posts: 3495


Hollywood, CA


« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2014, 12:02:19 PM »

Hi Jen - I have yet to use any HP on my plants.  I first need to get some of the professional strength version of 40% so I can dilute it down to 8% as is recommended.  My pest problems here have been ok so far this season so I have not found the need.

Part of me wonders if it would do anything for root rot/dry rot situations...that is always a problem popping up once in a while with a few of my young seedling plants.  Not sure how pathogens would be affected if at all by HP but my mind keeps on playing over how when you pour the regular H2O2 on something unhealthy it starts to bubble and fizz, cleaning it out.  I would first pour it directly on either roots and/or any infected wood if I have the chance.

Farmer D
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Merkity

Posts: 38


« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2014, 08:24:21 PM »

hmm - thats a thought - i have seen diluted bleach solutions used to try and kill various ailments, think i have also seen something about H2O2 on the orchid boards as well - have to go back and look - i would want to look up what other interactions it might have with the live wood - must something about it posted on the internet.
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tropicalken

Posts: 22


« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2014, 09:37:10 PM »

Here is some information on using the 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide to make an insecticidal spray.

Adult bugs do not like hydrogen peroxide. As soon as you notice insects harmful to your plants, especially beetles, spray the bugs themselves with a hydrogen peroxide mixture. Hydrogen peroxide is technically water with an additional oxygen atom. While adult bugs do not like hydrogen peroxide, the extra oxygen in the mixture will kill the eggs and larvae from insects that have been on your plants.

Mixture
•   Mixing up a batch of hydrogen peroxide spray for your plants is easy. Simply add 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide to a gallon of water. Stir and it is ready for a spray bottle. Pour the mixture into a spray bottle using a funnel if necessary. Make sure when purchasing peroxide to only buy food grade. Other grades may include medicinal chemicals that are not so good for using on your plants.
How Often
•   Spray the leaves of your plants as soon as you see any insects taking up residence. This will help to get rid of the bugs. To keep bugs from infecting your garden plants, spray them once a week with the hydrogen peroxide mixture. Make sure to coat the leaves as well as spraying around the base of the plant to prevent the root-boring insects from damaging your crops. If you start noticing a lot of bugs, spray two or three times per week or after it rains, as the rain will wash away any hydrogen peroxide residue.

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tropicalken

Posts: 22


« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2014, 11:18:18 PM »

Here's another recipe using hydrogen peroxide as an insecticidal spray.

Foliage Pesticide Spray -
1.Mix equal parts 3% Hydrogen Peroxide and distilled water.
2.Use a spray bottle to thoroughly soak the infected plants. Make sure to get the undersides of the leaves.
3.Spray once a week or after it rains. Hydrogen peroxide both treats and further prevents pest infestation.
•This weaker solution will prevent damage to the leaves but is effective as a general insecticide. I've found that the hydrogen peroxide is effective against a variety of mites and aphids. Because hydrogen peroxide also has fungicidal properties, one may find it as a possible solution to mildew and fungus outbreaks.
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Merkity

Posts: 38


« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2014, 06:41:01 AM »

so i did go back and read through some of the posts in the orchidboard.   the main use of H2O2 there is as an anti-bacterial and anti-fungal measure.  no real talk of bug control on that front.  but it seems to have worked for several folks getting rid of fungus in the roots of the orchids.
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